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Northern Lights Alert

Get the Northern Lights -app and know exactly when the sky will be painted.
Northern Lights is the name used for the Aurora Borealis seen in the Northern Hemisphere.
Don´t miss out on the Northern Lights.
The unique alarm system is available for only 5 euros.

Get the Northern Lights -app and know exactly when the sky will be painted.
Northern Lights is the name used for the Aurora Borealis seen in the Northern Hemisphere.
Don´t miss out on the Northern Lights.
The unique alarm system is available for only 5 euros.

Northern Lights – Aurora Borealis Info

The original source of energy for the Northern Lights comes from the sun, even though the auroral light itself is generated by the Earth’s stratosphere, 100-200 km above the surface.

Particles are continually being released into space from the sun. The flow of these so called solar wind particles also end up in the Earth’s atmosphere. There, the auroral light-generating process is basically the same as, for example, a fluorescent lamp: from the top-down, the electrons falling in the direction of the Earth’s magnetic field collide with oxygen atoms and nitrogen molecules in the ionosphere, which are then excited momentarily into a state of higher energy. In the dissolution of the excited state, the excitation energy is released as photons, i.e. light.

The speeds of the hundreds of particles arriving into the upper atmosphere are up to 1000 kilometres per second. The colour of the light resulting from the dissolution of the excited state depends on the quality of the excited particles and the energy that’s gained through the collisions: in the oxygen excited state, green and red light is generated, while nitrogen molecules receive and emit a bluish-toned amount of quantum energy.

The earth’s dipole-like magnetic field directs the charged particles towards the areas surrounding the atmospheric magnetic poles, which are called auroral ovals. The exact location, latitude and auroral intensity of the areas of Northern Lights at each longitude sphere varies according to, among others, the prevalent solar activity and the resultant magnetic activity of the Earth’s near-space.

The annular ovals are always present in each hemisphere, but daylight prevents us from seeing the midday auroras outside the darkest regions of polar winters. The majority of the auroral zones in both the northern and the southern hemisphere are located in uninhabited areas. Typically, the Northern Lights can only be viewed in the latitudes of northern Fennoscandia, Svalbard, Iceland, northern Canada, Alaska and Siberia.

Source: Finnish Meteorological Institute
http://aurorasnow.fmi.fi/public_service/

The original source of energy for the Northern Lights comes from the sun, even though the auroral light itself is generated by the Earth’s stratosphere, 100-200 km above the surface.

Particles are continually being released into space from the sun. The flow of these so called solar wind particles also end up in the Earth’s atmosphere. There, the auroral light-generating process is basically the same as, for example, a fluorescent lamp: from the top-down, the electrons falling in the direction of the Earth’s magnetic field collide with oxygen atoms and nitrogen molecules in the ionosphere, which are then excited momentarily into a state of higher energy. In the dissolution of the excited state, the excitation energy is released as photons, i.e. light.

The speeds of the hundreds of particles arriving into the upper atmosphere are up to 1000 kilometres per second. The colour of the light resulting from the dissolution of the excited state depends on the quality of the excited particles and the energy that’s gained through the collisions: in the oxygen excited state, green and red light is generated, while nitrogen molecules receive and emit a bluish-toned amount of quantum energy.

The earth’s dipole-like magnetic field directs the charged particles towards the areas surrounding the atmospheric magnetic poles, which are called auroral ovals. The exact location, latitude and auroral intensity of the areas of Northern Lights at each longitude sphere varies according to, among others, the prevalent solar activity and the resultant magnetic activity of the Earth’s near-space.

The annular ovals are always present in each hemisphere, but daylight prevents us from seeing the midday auroras outside the darkest regions of polar winters. The majority of the auroral zones in both the northern and the southern hemisphere are located in uninhabited areas. Typically, the Northern Lights can only be viewed in the latitudes of northern Fennoscandia, Svalbard, Iceland, northern Canada, Alaska and Siberia.

Source: Finnish Meteorological Institute
http://aurorasnow.fmi.fi/public_service/

The probability of seeing the Northern Lights

Locations

According to our research, there is a good chance of seeing the Northern Lights in the following locations. Alta, Gallivare, Inari, Iso-Syöte, Ivalo, Kemi-Tornio, Kiruna, Levi, Lofoten, Murmansk, Narvik, Pallas, Pyha, Reykjavik, Riksgransen, Rovaniemi, Ruka, Saariselkä, Tromso, Utsjoki, Yllas. You can now buy your own Northern Lights alarm for these destinations.

According to our research, there is a good chance of seeing the Northern Lights in the following locations. Alta, Gallivare, Inari, Iso-Syöte, Ivalo, Kemi-Tornio, Kiruna, Levi, Lofoten, Murmansk, Narvik, Pallas, Pyha, Reykjavik, Riksgransen, Rovaniemi, Ruka, Saariselkä, Tromso, Utsjoki, Yllas. You can now buy your own Northern Lights alarm for these destinations.

Get your own Northern Lights alerting system.

The unique alarm system will let you know 1-2 hours in advance if the Northern Lights will be visible in your area in Lapland.

Get your own Northern Lights alerting system.

The unique alarm system will let you know 1-2 hours in advance if the Northern Lights will be visible in your area in Northern Hemisphere.

How can you take successful pictures of the Northern Lights?

Markus Kiili is a dedicated Northern Lights photographer from Ylläs, Finnish Lapland. His wonderful photos and videos are a result of decades of passion to capture the magic of Lapland’s Northern Lights. The majority of photos and videos on this particular site are made and edited by Markus. If you would like to visually capture what you see and learn how to photograph the Northern Lights, you could learn more through photography courses run by Markus in the wilderness of Lapland.

Additional photos, videos, and information on the course options are available at: www.markuskiili.com

Markus Kiili is a dedicated Northern Lights photographer from Ylläs, Finnish Lapland. His wonderful photos and videos are a result of decades of passion to capture the magic of Lapland’s Northern Lights. The majority of photos and videos on this particular site are made and edited by Markus. If you would like to visually capture what you see and learn how to photograph the Northern Lights, you could learn more through photography courses run by Markus in the wilderness of Lapland.

Additional photos, videos, and information on the course options are available at: www.markuskiili.com

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